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Online GPS/BaseCamp Course Log

Below is a running log of posts from the NER Facebook Group about GPS/BaseCamp that began on November 15. 2019

This log is best used while looking at the Learn BaseCamp Agenda:

https://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/Learn_BaseCamp.htm

To see all the original posts with replies, visit the NER Facebook Group and search GPS/BaseCamp Post #

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NewEnglandRiders

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Ed Conde: November 15 at 4:19 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #1: Why use GPS/BaseCamp

I am going to start this series with some preliminary posts. I will not do any technical posts for a bit.

Why use a routing tool when we ride? I went years using paper maps and spreadsheets and thought that I did just fine. That, however, changed big time once I learned to really use a GPS. I do not mean the vanilla point to point routing that Google Maps can do. I mean more complicated routes where every road is important.

Couldn't I just follow my fender? YES! I still do often, especially when I am scouting. I can simply do this at any time by turning the GPS off or not taking it that day.

Why is GPS routing different? There are a few reasons:
 

  1. Without GPS, I often followed larger numbered roads because they were easier to follow. I tended to ride the same roads for the most part with a few new ones mixed in.

  2. With GPS, I learned that most of the best riding roads in the East are not numbered roads and are not particularly easy to follow. An added huge bonus was that most of these smaller roads were empty.

  3. GPS allowed me to get incredibly lost with absolutely no worries about finding my way back, finding gas, finding food, etc. I could also keep track of my time by directing the GPS to Go Home and wandering around until the arrival time matched the time I needed to be back.

  4. The GPS gives the rider a pretty good idea of what the road is about to do ahead. I am rarely surprised by hairpins or unexpected turns like thos in SE Ohio. I am not saying that I rely on the GPS, but it is a great tool to have.

  5. The GPS allows the rider to share superb rides like the ones on the NER website. Being able to Plug and Play is pretty damn sweet.
     

https://www.newenglandriders.org/Rides/Best_Motorcycle_Rides.htm

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Ed Conde: November 16 at 8:11 AM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #2: Why use GPS/BaseCamp


I am going to start this series with some preliminary posts. I will not do any technical posts for a bit.

Why use a dedicated Garmin GPS/BaseCamp instead of a phone app or a different GPS? Phone apps have come a long way over the last few years. The performance of a very few apps, based on other's reviews, approaches a dedicated GPS. Why use a Garmin GPS over the phone app or a non-Garmin GPS? BASECAMP.

BaseCamp is, by far, the most powerful routing tool that I know of. Does Garmin do a good job of making it intuitive? NO! Does Garmin support BaseCamp? NO! Do most people lack the patience and perseverance to learn BaseCamp? YES! Should you consider taking a few hours to learn it? ABSOLUTELY YES! Will we at NER help you learn it? YOU BET!

What makes BaseCamp so powerful? The power comes from the brilliant database format. What this means is that all of your best motorcycle roads, restaurants, views, things to see, hotels, campsites, etc. are always there for you to use. You can also import all the best roads, etc. from the NER website and use them to create your own rides in seconds. For example, one could choose the route tool and trace the best roads shown in the photo below in about 15 seconds. BOOM, you are done. Nothing else can do that.

 

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Ed Conde: November 17 at 8:26 AM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #3: Why use GPS/BaseCamp

I am going to start this series with some preliminary posts. I will not do any technical posts for a bit.

The best routing devices allow you to make rides with as many things to see and as many route points as you want. This allows the user to create and/or download the best rides with the best roads.

The best routing device is one that is easily removed from your bike and attached to your computer. An integrated GPS that cannot easily be removed is slightly more useful than a paperweight.

Look for a Garmin GPS that does multi-point routing and is compatible with BaseCamp.

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Ed Conde: November 17 at 5:46 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #4: Will a GPS distract you?

I am going to start this series with some preliminary posts. I will not do any technical posts for a bit.

Will a GPS distract you? I believe that it depends on the person and how they use it. It you stare at the GPS and/or make adjustments while moving, then you can get into trouble. If however, you use audio directions and/or use cursory glances then I feel that distraction is minimal. I would argue that someone without a GPS who is vaguely crawling along looking for street names, etc. is way more dangerous than someone who knows where they are going.

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Ed Conde: November 18 at 7:48 AM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #5: What type of GPS?

I am going to start this series with some preliminary posts. I will not do any technical posts for a bit.

What are some of the things that I must have on my nav device?

  1. The device must be able to use multi-point routes. My favorite rides tend to snake around from one good road to another. I need a device that is able to do that.

  2. My nav device must have a large screen that is easy to read.

  3. It must be waterproof.

  4. It must work without phone service or wifi.

  5. The device must be glove friendly.

  6. Being shock resistant is a priority.

  7. It must be compatible with BaseCamp. BaseCamp is such a powerful database that it transforms routing to a whole new level.

  8. Swapping rides with friends must be quick and easy. Wireless would be ideal.

  9. The device must download a well crafted route accurately.

  10. It must be easy to remove from the bike. If integrated, it must easily go back and forth between the bike and the computer.

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Ed Conde: November 18 at 1:31 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #6: Why use BaseCamp and the NER website?

Take a few minutes to watch this video and appreciate the power of BaseCamp in conjunction with the NER Best Eastern Riding website: https://www.facebook.com/gardner.grayjr/videos/2265818403442469/

https://www.newenglandriders.org/BestEasternMC.htm

There is absolutely nothing else that begins to approach the power of this combination.

The important things to notice are:

  1. You can very quickly use all the best roads, views, restaurants, things to see, hotels, dirt roads, and camping on the website to create the best rides in less than a minute.

  2. You can keep all of your best riding in one place for easy reference during ride creation.

  3. You can use BaseCamp to quickly edit the hundreds of full rides on our rides page: https://www.newenglandriders.org/Rides/Best_Motorcycle_Rides.htm

It is not just your Nav device that is important. It is your Nav device in conjuction with BaseCamp and the NER website.

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Ed Conde: November 18 at 9:08 PM
 

To search for and keep track of the series of GPS/BaseCamp posts, type GPS/BaseCamp Post # into the "Search this group" window at the left of the Group Page. I will continue as long as there is an expressed interest. Eventually, I may put it all on the webpage.
These posts will make it so that you will slowly learn GPS/BaseCamp painlessly. Follow along each day and we will get there eventually. You will need a Garmin GPS that does mult-point routing and a computer with BaseCamp.
Concurrently, I will be looking at phone apps. I sure could use a little help with that if you are pretty proficient with phone apps.

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Ed Conde: November 19 at 12:33 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #7: What is a Route?

I am going to start this series with some preliminary posts. I will not do any technical posts for a bit.

What is a Route? This important question is at the heart of good gps/app navigation. The emphatic answer is that there is no such thing as a route.

All gps/phone navigation is based on points. A GPS device, a phone app, and BaseCamp all use these points to create "routes" using software and user settings.

For example, a user puts points on a dozen roads between Providence and Boston. All navigation devices will create "routes" that cross these 12 points. Unfortunately, there are infinite road combinations that a device can choose to connect these points. Depending on the uploaded map, the GPS settings (fastest route or shortest route), the routing settings (curvy roads, etc.), and avoidances (no toll roads, etc.) the device will create a "route" as it sees fit. My big suggestion for sharing routes and making them predictable is "Turn all that junk off!" Take control of your routing, do not let a dumb device route for you.

I suggest turning off all avoidances, using standard navigation (not curvy roads), and keeping your maps updated. The only way to ensure that a route will go where you want is to use enough points to force it there. The less points that you use, the better the chance that the GPS/ phone app will take you where you do not want to go.

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Ed Conde: November 20 at 6:17 AM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #8: Setting up your GPS & BaseCamp

You will need your fully charged GPS, your USB cable, and a laptop with power cord. You should familiarize yourself with Garmin BaseCamp by reviewing the videos on Introduction, Installing, Organize & Filter, Routes, Find and Transfer by clicking on https://www.garmin.com/en-US/learning-center/basecamp-pc for pc or https://www.garmin.com/en-US/learning-center/basecamp-mac for mac.

If you are, feeling inspired, you can also look over the Owner’s Manuals and the BaseCamp Help files accessible from the Basecamp Menu Bar or by clicking on https://support.garmin.com/en-US/?productID=52801&tab=topics

I recommend that you buy an SD card (memory card) for your GPS and upload routes to it instead of to the GPS internal memory. If your route becomes corrupted while on the road, you can download it again from the SD card. An SD card may also be handy for exchanging routes with friends on the road. Create a folder labeled "Garmin" and a subfolder labeled "GPX" on the card (some GPSes create these folders automatically.) These folders will contain the routes sent from BaseCamp

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Ed Conde: November 21 at 7:06 AM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #9: Welcome to the NER GPS & BaseCamp Online Tutorial

We will now begin a slow, easy going course about using you Garmin GPS and BaseCamp. This will be low key and stress free. To be successful, you have to do one thing - ask questions about anything that you do not understand. I have learned everything by the tried and true bang-your-head-against-the-wall method and will try to save you some of my anguish.

Let's start by having everyone download the latest copy of the Agenda
For PC: http://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/Learn_BaseCamp_PC_19.pdf

For Mac: http://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/Learn_BaseCamp_MAC_19.pdf

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Ed Conde: November 21 at 4:02 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #10: Downloads

A) Downloads

Download the following programs:

1) You should have the latest version of BaseCamp loaded to your computer: https://www.garmin.com/en-US/shop/downloads/basecamp

2) Download Garmin Express to your computer: http://software.garmin.com/en-US/express.html

3) Use Garmin Express to update both the map in BaseCamp AND the map in your GPS to the latest version. For new map update installations, there is an option under the link "Advanced Options" that allows you to update both maps at the same time. If you do not select this option then only your GPS will be updated. If you have previously loaded the maps only to the GPS you can use Garmin Express to load a copy to your computer. Under “Map Options” select “Install to Computer.” Then “Accept Agreement” and finally “Continue.”

***Note - You can download Open Source Maps for Garmin to use in BaseCamp for your phone or non-Garmin GPS. Those outside of North America can also do this to follow the Agenda. I have never done this, but others in the Group have. Post to the Group for help.***

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Ed Conde: November 22 at 6:58 AM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #11: GPX files

B) Introduction - GPX files

Zumos and other Garmin devices use and create generic gpx files. The important thing to remember is that gpx files are not routes. They are merely a series of points like breadcrumbs left along a route. Each person's copy of BaseCamp will draw a "route" using these points according to the map installed, the BaseCamp version, and the BaseCamp settings.

If you were to download the "route" below in figure 1, your copy of BaseCamp would decide one of the four possibilities between points 2 and 3 depending on your setup. This is why it is important that you set up BaseCamp properly for your needs. It is also important that you recalculate any downloaded routes in BaseCamp so that the "route" is drawn to your unique setup.

Those planning and posting routes can help others if they use enough via points to force BaseCamp to follow your specific route. Do this by putting a via point/waypoint on a specific road when BaseCamp needs to make a decision. In the example below, a good route creator would put a via point between points 2 and 3 on the specific road that they want to use.


 

When you download your perfect BaseCamp route to your Zumo/GPS, it again only downloads points. The map loaded onto your Zumo/GPS and the settings of your GPS determine how your GPS draws these points into a route. It is important that you again re-calculate the route on your GPS so that it conforms to the unique map/settings on your GPS. The map and settings that you use on your GPS are very important when you try to download and use a route. In summation, you need to recalculate your route in BaseCamp and again after downloading from BaseCamp to your GPS.

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Ed Conde: November 22 at 9:24 AM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #12: BaseCamp Interface

Take some time looking at the BaseCamp Interface until you know the terminology and where everything is.

This is the last introduction post before we dive into BaseCamp. Please review posts 1-11 by typing GPS/BaseCamp Post # into the group search.

Have detailed maps (not just the global map) loaded to both your GPS and your BaseCamp. I covered this in a previous post. I guarantee that multiple people will miss this step because they are trying to skip ahead.
Get everything ready and tell anyone who might be interested. The train is getting ready to leave the station.

PC: http://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/BC-PC.jpg

Mac: http://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/BC-Mac.jpg

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Ed Conde: November 24 at 3:35 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #13: Welcome!

Welcome to all of our new friends from Germany, Chile, the U.K., Canada, the U.S, and others who have joined us for the GPS/BaseCamp Class.

Please review the first 12 posts of the series that I have added to our website: https://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/BaseCamp-Online-Log.htm. I will periodically update the website so that all posts are very easy to review in chronological order.

Answers to a few questions that have come up:

  1. Why not create a new Group for this course? There are a few reasons, but I may change my mind depending on how things go. First, every Winter I have done a series of posts to keep the Group interesting. I have done series on the best views in the East: https://www.newenglandriders.org/BestOfNorthEast/Favorite_Views.htm. I have done best roads: https://www.newenglandriders.org/BestOfNorthEast/Favorite_Roads.htm. I have done "Where in the Northeast? and others. My themes for this year has been "GPS/BaseCamp" and "Best Rides."

  2. It has been terribly difficult to get many folks to go to yet another Group. Our great NER Photo Contest Group is a great example: https://www.facebook.com/groups/NERphotos/. It is an awesome Group with a great concept, but is has been very difficult getting folks to give it a try.

  3. I am involved running the website, 5 NER Groups, 1 NER page, and the forum. I just cannot bear the thought of taking on any more.

Next we are going to begin Example 1 in Part 1 of the Agenda: https://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/Learn_BaseCamp.htm. Please look it over and be ready for Example 1.

Things will definitely go much better if you ask questions. Kindly do not let me go on if you do not fully understand something. I am using this format so that you have plenty of time to ask questions and so that you can go at your own pace.

At this time, everyone should have detailed maps loaded to their GPS AND to BaseCamp as described in my previous posts and in the Agenda. This is the time to ask for help.

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Ed Conde November 24 at 7:04 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #14: BaseCamp Setup

*** PC Version (Mac Version below) ***

C) BaseCamp Setup (Do not connect your GPS to your computer yet.)

1) Set options in BaseCamp Toolbar: Right click on the toolbar and check all except Playback, Playback Info, Task Launcher, and Area Avoidances. Next, set these options in the toolbar: Activity Profile = Motorcycling, Select Map Product = City Navigator North America NT 2019.3 (or the most recent version), Map Detail = Highest.

2) Next, set the following options in the menu: Edit>Options>Activity Profile = Motorcycling

3) Next, we are going to change the preferences and avoidances for the motorcycle activity profile. This may change some of your older routes that were created using the motorcycle activity profile. If in doubt, backup BaseCamp and all your routes by going to File>Backup. In general, it is better to shut all avoidances off and not rely on avoidances to draw your route. It is better to add enough via points to force the route where you want to go. Go to the BaseCamp menu and select these choices:

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Edit>Options>Activity Profile>Routing>Route Preferences = Faster Time.

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Edit>Options>Activity Profile>Routing>Road Type Avoidances = All Unchecked

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Edit>Options>Activity Profile>Routing>Feature Type Avoidances = All Unchecked

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Edit>Options>Activity Profile>Routing>Area Avoidances = Unchecked

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Edit>Options>Activity Profile>General>Map Display Features>Select. Expand Points by selecting the + icon. Expand Transportation by selecting the + icon. Uncheck Air Transportation so your map is not cluttered with airport icons (You can uncheck other items if desired).

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View>Map Controls>On


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***MAC Version***


C) BaseCamp Setup (Do not connect your GPS to your computer yet.)

1) Select the Tools to display in the BaseCamp Toolbar:  Select View/Customize Toolbar form the Menu Bar. o Select: Device Transfer, Map Tools, Creation Tools, Overview Map, Get Info, Currently displayed Map, Assistants and Activity and drag them to the tool bar.

2) Next, set the activity to Motorcycling using the pull-down Activity box in the Toolbar.

3) Next we are going to change the preferences and avoidances for the motorcycle activity profile. This may change some of your older routes that were created using the motorcycle activity profile. If in doubt, backup BaseCamp and all your routes by going to File>Backup in the Menu Bar. In general, it is better to shut all avoidances off and not rely on avoidances to draw your route. It is better to add enough via points to force the route where you want to go. Go to the BaseCamp>Preferences in the Menu Bar. The preferences window lets you select General, Display, Routing, Find, Controls, and Advanced preferences.

> Under the Routing tab:

Make sure Motorcycling is the selected Activity

Select Fastest Time

Uncheck all Road Type Avoidances

Uncheck all Feature Type Avoidances, (except Cable Car, Climbing Paths and Narrow Trails)

> Under the Display Tab:

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Click “Hide Map Features”

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Scroll to the bottom and expand Transportation by clicking on the arrow Icon

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Uncheck Air Transportation so your map is not cluttered with airport icons. (You may uncheck other items if desired). Click Okay

> Under the Controls Tab:

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Check the Box to “Use Option while dragging to move data”.

> Under the Transfer Tab

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Uncheck all boxes. Then click Apply to all Devices

> Close the Preferences Window

> On the map, move the cursor to the Map Controls area.

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Move the Detail Slider all the way to the right to display the most detail. Check the boxes for Labels and Overlays.

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Ed Conde November 25 at 7:46 AM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #15: GPS Setup
 

D) GPS Setup

Set up your GPS as described below:

 

a) Zumo 590 and 390 series, BMW Nav 5 & Nav 6

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Settings>Navigation>Avoidances>Disabled (all boxes unchecked) > Save

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Settings>Calculation Mode>Faster Time> Save

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Tap Vehicle Icon in upper left of main screen>Motorcycle>Save

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Settings>Map & Vehicle>Map Detail>More>Save


b) Zumo 660 series, BMW Nav 4

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Tools>Settings>Navigation>Avoidances. (Disabled) Uncheck everything, especially seasonal closures and unpaved roads.

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Tools>Settings>Navigation> Route Preferences = Faster Time

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Tools>Settings>System>Usage Mode = Motorcycle.

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Tools>Settings>Map>Map Detail = High.


c) Zumo 550/450

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Tools (wrench icon)>Navigation>Avoidances>Disabled (all boxes unchecked). Especially Unpaved Roads and Ferries.

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Tools (wrench icon)>Navigation>Route Preferences = Faster Time

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Tools (wrench icon)>Map>Map Detail = Most

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Ed Conde November 25 at 2:47 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #16: BaseCamp Layout

Your BaseCamp should look like the attached photo before beginning example 1.

Ask questions.

 

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Ed Conde November 25 at 7:20 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #17: BaseCamp Folders & Lists
 

***PC Version - (Mac version below)***

E) Organizing Your Folders and Lists

Good organization of your My Collection Folders & Lists is the most important things that you can do to make BaseCamp easier.

Your Library is shown in the upper left corner of your BaseCamp screen. (#4)

Your library consists of a master folder called My Collection and other Folders and Lists under My Collection. Think of My Collection as a file cabinet, Folders as file cabinet folders, and Lists as sheets of paper with routes and waypoints. It is important to name your Folders so that you can group similar rides. It is also important that you name your Lists so they describe your ride or trip.

1) I suggest that you create the following Folders for the class and beyond: Temp, BONE, My_Rides, NER_Rides, and NER_Trips. To do this, right click on the "My Collection" folder and select "New List Folder." Name this first folder Temp. Repeat to create BONE, MY_Rides, NER_Rides, and NER_Trips Folders. Create a Massachusetts Folder in the BONE List Folder. To do this, right click on the "BONE" folder and select "New List Folder." Name this folder Massachusetts.

2) Next, we are going to create a List called Temp in the Temp folder, and a List called Favorites in My Collection. Right click on the Temp folder and select "New List." Name this list Temp. Right click on the My Collection folder and select "New List." Name this list Favorites.

The Favorites List is where you are going to keep Waypoints that you use a lot. Common Waypoints for this list will be Home, Vanilla Bean Cafe, Shell Orange and other points that you use often when creating routes. You will be able to copy and paste these Waypoints into other Lists when creating routes.

The Temp List is a temporary clean workspace where you create routes before transferring to a final List folder.

Any waypoints and routes that are not in a list will be in the "Unlisted Data" folder. If your organization is good, you should have few items in the "Unlisted Data" folder. You do not want duplicate Waypoints. Create a Waypoint only once and then copy and paste it where needed. If you keep creating or downloading the same waypoint, you will end up with Home, Home1, Home2, Home3, etc. Your BaseCamp will get messy in a hurry.

Your Library should look somewhat like the Figure below.
(my library has more folders than we have discussed, but you get the idea):

 


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***Mac Version***


E) Organizing Your List Folders and Lists

Good organization of your My Collection List Folders and Lists is one of the most important things that you can do to make BaseCamp easier.

Your Library is shown in the upper left corner of your BaseCamp screen (#4).

Your library consists of a master folder called My Collection and other List Folders and Lists under My Collection. Think of My Collection as a file cabinet, List Folders as file cabinet folders, and Lists as sheets of paper with routes and waypoints. It is important to name your List Folders so that you can group similar rides. It’s also important that you name your Lists so they describe your ride or trip.

1) I suggest that you create the following List Folders for the class and beyond: Temp, BONE, My_Rides, NER_Rides, and NER_Trips. To do this, click on the "My Collection" folder and select "File/New List Folder" in the Menu Bar. Name this first folder “Temp”. Repeat to create BONE, MY_Rides, NER_Rides, and NER_Trips List Folders.

Create a Massachusetts List Folder in the BONE List Folder. To do this, click on the "BONE" folder and select "File/New List Folder" from the Menu Bar. Name this folder “Massachusetts”.

2) Next we are going to create a List called Temp in the Temp List folder, and a List called Favorites in My Collection. Click on the Temp List folder and select "File/New List" from the Menu Bar. Name this list “Temp”. Click on the My Collection folder and select "File/New List." Name this list “Favorites”.

The Favorites List is where you will be keeping Waypoints that you use a lot. Common Waypoints for this list will be Home, Vanilla Bean Cafe, Shell Orange and other points that you use often when creating routes. You will be able to copy and paste these Waypoints into other Lists when creating routes.

The Temp List is a temporary clean workspace where you create routes before transferring to a final List folder.

Any waypoints and routes that are not in a list will be listed in the "Unlisted Data" folder. If your organization is good you should have few items in the "Unlisted Data" folder. You do not want duplicate Waypoints. Create a Waypoint only once and then copy and paste it where needed. If you keep creating or downloading the same waypoint you will end up with Home, Home1, Home2, Home3, etc. Your BaseCamp will get messy in a hurry.

Your My Collection should look somewhat like the Figure below)

(my library has more folders than we have discussed, but you get the idea):

 

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Ed Conde November 26 12:57 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #18: Loading Maps

A number of folks have problems with this so I will repeat map loading into BaseCamp here. Look at the attached photos.

With your GPS connected, start Garmin Express.

Choose your GPS (an update window will open)

 

 

Select View Details (updates will show)

 

 

 

 

For the U.S. and Canada map, select Installation Options

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Select Device only (your GPS) if you alrady have the detailed map in Basecamp

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Select Computer and Device if you are updating the map on your GPS and in BaseCamp.

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Select Computer Only if you already have the latest map on your GPS, but not in BaseCamp.

 

 

If you do not have a detailed map loaded to BaseCamp, your map will show as Global Map as in the attachment. You can not route with a Global Map. Make sure that you have the detailed map loaded to your device and to BaseCamp. To check, disconnect your GPS and ensure that you have City Navigator North America NT 2020.20, or something similar, listed in your BaseCamp Map products drop down window.

 

 

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Ed Conde November 26 4:11 PM
GPS/BaseCamp Post #19: BaseCamp Toolbar

Familiarize yourself with the BaseCamp Toolbar. I have attached the PC version first followed by the Mac version.

***PC Version***

 

 

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***MAC Version***

 

 

 

 

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Ed Conde November 26 3:58 PM
The GPS/BaseCamp posts have progressed to where everyone should be ready to begin Example 1.

I timed this so that folks can look everything over during the Holiday break.
I have chosen posting to this Facebook Group so that all those that felt flustered with BaseCamp could have a venue where they could go slow and ask questions. Anybody should be able to learn this if they take their time, skip nothing, and ask questions.
I encourage everyone who has ever wanted to route really well to catch up and join us as we move forward on the Examples. I am doing this for you.
Review the online Agendas for PC or Mac and make sure that you are ready to begin Example 1: https://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/Learn_BaseCamp.htm

I will upload videos and answer all questions. The trick is that you have to ask and not be bashful.

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Ed Conde December 1 at 10:24 AM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #20: Agenda Example 1

PC (Mac version below)
 

G) EXAMPLES

To learn BaseCamp, let us do 2 examples

I) Example 1 - Using Tools to create and alter a route.

1) Open BaseCamp

2) Go to the Best Of the NorthEast (BONE) page of the website: http://www.newenglandriders.org/BestOfNorthEast/BestOfNorthEast.htm
 

3) Select "Best Scenic Views" and then "Massachusetts." Click on the GPX link near the top of the page. The file should save to your computer - note the location. Go back to BaseCamp and click on your BONE>Massachusetts Folder. Next, go to the menu and select File>Import into "Massachusetts." Select MAViews from where it was saved on your computer and then select "Open." MAViews should now be saved to the BONE>Massachusetts Folder of My Collection.

4) If it saved elsewhere, move your cursor to the "MAViews" List and press and hold the left mouse button. Drag the List to BONE>Massachusetts Folder. You now have your first List in the BONE folder!

5) Now that we have the Massachusetts BONE Views saved to BaseCamp, we are going to use those views to create a route.

Copy and paste all of the MAViews waypoints from the "MAViews" List to the Temp List. To do this, select BONE>Massachusetts>MAViews. All of the Waypoints in MAViews should appear in the lower pane - the lower pane always displays the contents of the Folder or List that you select in the upper pane. Move your cursor to the top waypoint in the lower pane named Aquinnah Cliffs. Press the left mouse button to select this waypoint. Hold down the CTRL key and press the A key to select all items in MAViews. Go up to the menu and select Edit>Copy (or move the cursor to the highlighted items and then press the right mouse button and select copy.) Move your cursor to the Temp List in the Temp Folder and press the left mouse button to select it. Go to the menu and select Edit>Paste (or press the right mouse button and select paste.) All of the waypoints should now be in the Temp folder. This is our workspace.
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MAC

G) EXAMPLES

To learn BaseCamp, let's do 2 examples

I) Example 1 - Using Tools to create and alter a route.

1) Open BaseCamp

2) Go to the Best Of the NorthEast (BONE) page of the website: http://www.newenglandriders.org/BestOfNorthEast/BestOfNorthEast.htm

3) Select "Best Scenic Views" and then "Massachusetts." Click on the GPX link near the top of the page. The file should save to your computer - note the location. Go back to BaseCamp and click on your BONE>Massachusetts List Folder. Next, go to the Menu Bar and select File>Import into "Massachusetts." Select MAViews from where it was saved on your computer and then select "Open." MAViews should now be saved to the BONE>Massachusetts List Folder of My Collection.

4) If it saved elsewhere, move your cursor to the "MAViews" List and press and hold the left mouse button. Drag the List to BONE>Massachusetts List Folder. You now have your first List in the BONE folder!

5) Now that we have the Massachusetts BONE Views saved to BaseCamp, we are going to use those views to create a route.
 

Copy and paste all of the MAViews waypoints from the "MAViews" List to the Temp List. To do this, select BONE>Massachusetts>MAViews. All of the Waypoints in MAViews should appear in the lower pane - the lower pane always displays the contents of the Folder or List that you select in the upper pane. Move your cursor to the top waypoint in the lower pane named Aquinnah Cliffs. Hold down the Apple/Command key and press the A key. Go up to the Menu Bar and select Edit>Copy. Move your cursor to the Temp List in the Temp List Folder and click to select it. Go to the Menu Bar and select Edit>Paste. All of the waypoints should now be in the Temp folder. This is our work space.

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Ed Conde December 2 at 2:55 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #21: MA Views

Windows Version (Mac version below)

5) Now that we have the Massachusetts BONE Views saved to BaseCamp, we are going to use those views to create a route.

Copy and paste all of the MAViews waypoints from the "MAViews" List to the Temp List. To do this, select BONE>Massachusetts>MAViews. All of the Waypoints in MAViews should appear in the lower pane - the lower pane always displays the contents of the Folder or List that you select in the upper pane. Move your cursor to the top waypoint in the lower pane named Aquinnah Cliffs. Press the left mouse button to select this waypoint. Hold down the CTRL key and press the A key to select all items in MAViews. Go up to the menu and select Edit>Copy (or move the cursor to the highlighted items and then press the right mouse button and select copy.) Move your cursor to the Temp List in the Temp Folder and press the left mouse button to select it. Go to the menu and select Edit>Paste (or press the right mouse button and select paste.) All of the waypoints should now be in the Temp folder. This is our workspace.

6) Let us create a Route beginning at the Route 202 Lookout waypoint. Make sure that the Temp list is selected in the Library so that the contents of Temp are displayed in the lower pane. Move your cursor to the Route 202 Lookout Waypoint in the lower pane and press your left button to select it. A Route 202 Lookout Waypoint flag should open on the map showing you where the Route 202 Lookout Waypoint is located.

Select the Route tool - your cursor should change to a pencil. Put your cursor over the Route 202 Lookout waypoint on your map until you see the Route 202 Lookout waypoint flag. Press your left mouse button - you should now have a line connecting the cursor and the Route 202 waypoint. Next, move your cursor to the left (west) on the map and left click on the following waypoints on your map in order (a flag will appear identifying the waypoint when you hover the cursor above it): Sugarloaf Mountain, Glacial Potholes, and Rte 2 Hairpin. Hit the escape key to end the route. Select the hand tool so that you do not start drawing another route by mistake. Your route should look like Figure 5 below:


 

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Mac Version

5) Now that we have the Massachusetts BONE Views saved to BaseCamp, we are going to use those views to create a route.

Copy and paste all of the MAViews waypoints from the "MAViews" List to the Temp List. To do this, select BONE>Massachusetts>MAViews. All of the Waypoints in MAViews should appear in the lower pane - the lower pane always displays the contents of the Folder or List that you select in the upper pane. Move your cursor to the top waypoint in the lower pane named Aquinnah Cliffs. Hold down the Apple/Command key and press the A key. Go up to the Menu Bar and select Edit>Copy. Move your cursor to the Temp List in the Temp List Folder and click to select it. Go to the Menu Bar and select Edit>Paste. All of the waypoints should now be in the Temp folder. This is our work space.

6) Let us create a Route beginning at the Route 202 Lookout waypoint. Make sure that the Temp folder is selected in the Library so that the contents of Temp are displayed in the lower pane. Move your cursor to the Route 202 Lookout Waypoint in the lower pane. Now from the Menu Bar select View>Show Selected Data on Map. A Route 202 Lookout Waypoint flag should open on the map showing you where the Route 202 Lookout Waypoint is located.

Select the Route Tool or press Control-R - your cursor should change an arrow with route icon. Put your cursor over the Route 202 Lookout waypoint on your map until you see the Route 202 Lookout waypoint flag and click - you should now have a line connecting the cursor and the Route 202 waypoint. Next, move your cursor to the left (west) on the map and left click on the following waypoints on your map in order (a flag will appear identifying the waypoint when you hover the cursor above it): Sugarloaf Mountain, Glacial Potholes, and Rte 2 Hairpin. Select the Hand Tool so that you do not start drawing another route by mistake. Your route should look like Figure 5 below:

 

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Ed Conde December 2 at 3:50 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #22: BaseCamp outdated?

Q - I received a message asking if BaseCamp will become passe if phone apps gain traction and/or Garmin stops supporting it.

A- Absolutely not. I do not anticipate any phone app or routing tool to come along that will equal the power of BaseCamp. Garmin never supported the program the way that they should have. They should have made it more intuitive and improved the help files.

The program, however, is incredibly good once you learn it well. The power is in the database format that I doubt anyone else will ever be ambitious enough to replicate. The trend is dumbing down navigation to make it more accessible. Unfortunately, this usually means removing capability. The software is a powerful part of any routing tool. Even if I used a phone, I would still use BaseCamp.

I will always use BaseCamp because of the database format. Being able to store everything in one place is a game changer. There is nothing else like it.

I have installation files saved just in case.

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GPS/BaseCamp Post #23: Important BaseCamp fact: The most important part of the Agenda is the setup and folders at the beginning of the Agenda (below.)

Many rush through this part to get to the the Examples. This is a mistake. Everything in this part is important. If you miss something here, it will probably come back to bite you. If you follow the directions carefully, then you are well on your way.

From the Agenda (PC version):

3) Use Garmin Express to update both the map in BaseCamp AND the map in your GPS to the latest version. For new map update installations, there is an option under the link "Advanced Options" that allows you to update both maps at the same time. If you do not select this option then only your GPS will be updated. If you have previously loaded the maps only to the GPS you can use Garmin Express to load a copy to your computer. Under “Map Options” select “Install to Computer.” Then “Accept Agreement” and finally “Continue.”

C) BaseCamp Setup (Do not connect your GPS to your computer yet.)

1) Set options in BaseCamp Toolbar: Right click on the toolbar and check all except Playback, Playback Info, Task Launcher, and Area Avoidances. Next, set these options in the toolbar: Activity Profile = Motorcycling, Select Map Product = City Navigator North America NT 2019.3 (or the most recent version), Map Detail = Highest.

2) Next, set the following options in the menu: Edit>Options>Activity Profile = Motorcycling

3) Next, we are going to change the preferences and avoidances for the motorcycle activity profile. This may change some of your older routes that were created using the motorcycle activity profile. If in doubt, backup BaseCamp and all your routes by going to File>Backup. In general, it is better to shut all avoidances off and not rely on avoidances to draw your route. It is better to add enough via points to force the route where you want to go. Go to the BaseCamp menu and select these choices:

 Edit>Options>Activity Profile>Routing>Route Preferences = Faster Time.

 Edit>Options>Activity Profile>Routing>Road Type Avoidances = All Unchecked

 Edit>Options>Activity Profile>Routing>Feature Type Avoidances = All Unchecked

 Edit>Options>Activity Profile>Routing>Area Avoidances = Unchecked

 Edit>Options>Activity Profile>General>Map Display Features>Select. Expand Points by selecting the + icon. Expand Transportation by selecting the + icon. Uncheck Air Transportation so your map is not cluttered with airport icons (You can uncheck other items if desired).

 View>Map Controls>On

D) GPS Setup Set up your GPS as described below

a) Zumo 590 and 390 series, BMW Nav 5 & Nav 6

 Settings>Navigation>Avoidances>Disabled (all boxes unchecked) > Save

 Settings>Calculation Mode>Faster Time> Save  Tap Vehicle Icon in upper left of main screen>Motorcycle>Save

 Settings>Map & Vehicle>Map Detail>More>Save

b) Zumo 660 series, BMW Nav 4

 Tools>Settings>Navigation>Avoidances. (Disabled) Uncheck everything, especially seasonal closures and unpaved roads.

 Tools>Settings>Navigation> Route Preferences = Faster Time

 Tools>Settings>System>Usage Mode = Motorcycle.

  Tools>Settings>Map>Map Detail = High.

c) Zumo 550/450

 Tools (wrench icon)>Navigation>Avoidances>Disabled (all boxes unchecked). Especially Unpaved Roads and Ferries.

 Tools (wrench icon)>Navigation>Route Preferences = Faster Time

 Tools (wrench icon)>Map>Map Detail = Most 7

E) Organizing Your Folders and Lists Good organization of your My Collection Folders & Lists is the most important things that you can do to make BaseCamp easier.

Your Library is shown in the upper left corner of your BaseCamp screen (see Figure 2.) Your library consists of a master folder called My Collection and other Folders and Lists under My Collection. Think of My Collection as a file cabinet, Folders as file cabinet folders, and Lists as sheets of paper with routes and waypoints. It is important to name your Folders so that you can group similar rides. It is also important that you name your Lists so they describe your ride or trip.

1) I suggest that you create the following Folders for the class and beyond: Temp, BONE, My_Rides, NER_Rides, and NER_Trips. To do this, right click on the "My Collection" folder and select "New List Folder." Name this first folder Temp. Repeat to create BONE, MY_Rides, NER_Rides, and NER_Trips Folders. Create a Massachusetts Folder in the BONE List Folder. To do this, right click on the "BONE" folder and select "New List Folder." Name this folder Massachusetts.

2) Next, we are going to create a List called Temp in the Temp folder, and a List called Favorites in My Collection. Right click on the Temp folder and select "New List." Name this list Temp. Right click on the My Collection folder and select "New List." Name this list Favorites.

The Favorites List is where you are going to keep Waypoints that you use a lot. Common Waypoints for this list will be Home, Vanilla Bean Cafe, Shell Orange and other points that you use often when creating routes. You will be able to copy and paste these Waypoints into other Lists when creating routes.

The Temp List is a temporary clean workspace where you create routes before transferring to a final List folder.

Any waypoints and routes that are not in a list will be in the "Unlisted Data" folder. If your organization is good, you should have few items in the "Unlisted Data" folder. You do not want duplicate Waypoints. Create a Waypoint only once and then copy and paste it where needed. If you keep creating or downloading the same waypoint, you will end up with Home, Home1, Home2, Home3, etc. Your BaseCamp will get messy in a hurry.

Your Library should look somewhat like this (Figure 3): (my library has more folders than we have discussed, but you get the idea):
https://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/Learn_BaseCamp.htm

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Ed Conde December 3 at 1:36 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #24: Conway

Windows Version (Mac version below)

From page 11 of the PC BaseCamp Agenda:

7) Let us alter the drawn route by inserting some via points. (Note - the route must be bold magenta on the map and the route name must be highlighted in your library in order to insert via points.)

Zoom into the area between Sugarloaf Mountain and Glacial potholes. There are various ways to zoom.

One of the best is to select the zoom tool (or press the Z key on your keyboard) - your cursor will change to a magnifying glass. Position the zoom cursor slightly above and to the left of the glacial potholes. Hold down the left mouse button and move the cursor to draw a rectangle that includes the glacial potholes and Sugarloaf Mountain and then let go of the mouse button. Voila! You can also zoom by selecting the zoom tool, position the cursor over the spot you want to zoom, and press the left mouse button.

Once you are zoomed in, select the insert tool (or press I on your keyboard) - your cursor will change to a pencil with a plus sign. Hover the Insert cursor over the magenta route between Sugarloaf Mountain and Glacial Potholes until a thick black line appears connecting the Sugarloaf Mountain waypoint to the Glacial Potholes waypoint (see figure 6 below.)

Keep your cursor in the same spot and press the left mouse button. A thin snap line should appear as shown in Figure 7.

Move your cursor (and the snap line) to Route 116 in Conway (see Figure 7.) Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to move Conway to the center of your screen. Use the + and - keys on your numeric keyboard (or Caps Lock & + or - on the regular keyboard) to zoom/pan to Conway so that you can snap your route near 185 Deerfield St as shown in Figure 8 (the exact address does not matter.)

Press the left mouse button and a via point should be inserted. The route should re-draw so that it looks like Figure 9.


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Mac Version

From page 12 of the Mac Agenda

7) Let’s alter the drawn route by inserting some via points. (Note - the route must be bold magenta on the map and the route name must be highlighted in your library in order to insert via points.)

Zoom into the area between Sugarloaf Mountain and Glacial potholes. There are various ways to zoom. One of the best is to select the Zoom Tool (Control-Z) - your cursor will change to a magnifying glass. Position the zoom cursor slightly above and to the left of the glacial potholes. Hold down the mouse button and draw a rectangle that includes the glacial potholes and Sugarloaf Mountain and then let go of the mouse button. Voila! You can also zoom by selecting the Zoom Tool, position the cursor over the spot you want to zoom, and press the left mouse button. Another way to Zoom is to move the cursor into the Map Controls Area and adjust the Zoom slider.

Change the cursor to the Select Tool (Control-S) and position cursor on magenta line between the Glacial Potholes and Sugarloaf Mountain points, Right Click the mouse then select “Insert Route Point”. Your cursor will change to a small hollow circle, with a thin black line (Snap Line) connecting the Sugarloaf Mountain & Glacial Potholes waypoints (see figure 6 below).

 

Move your cursor (and the Snap Line) to Route 116 in Conway (see Figure 7.)

 

Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to move Conway to the center of your screen. Use the + and - keys on your numeric keyboard (or Caps Lock & + or - on the regular keyboard) to zoom/pan to Conway so that you can snap your route to the intersection of S Deerfield Rd and Parsons Rd (see Figure 8).

 

Press the left mouse button and a via point should be inserted at the intersection of S Deerfield Rd and Parsons Rd.

The route should re-draw so that it looks like Figure 9.

 

 We took a little extra time to zoom in and snap the via point to an intersection because these points will not be announced nor marked by a flag on the GPS device. It can be irritating being out on a long ride and hearing every via point announced. The only via points that need to be announced are those you intend to stop at and those that are warnings or other announcements.

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Ed Conde December 4 at 1:48 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #25: SD Card vs Internal Memory

I was asked why I recommend sending routes to the SD card.

My answer is:

Routes can become corrupted and unusable when away on a ride/trip. If the route is saved only to internal memory and it becomes corrupted then you are screwed. If, however, you save the route to the SD card, you can reload a corrupted route. Keeping most routes on the SD card also allows you to upload routes only when you actually need them. This keeps internal memory clear which can be important for 660s and 550s with limited memory.

For an important ride or trip, I tend to keep rides on the SD card and internal memory.

If you have trouble uploading rides from your SD card to internal memory, I suggest that you try to fix the problem by calling Garmin and/or using online research.

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Ed Conde December 4 at 8:13 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #26: Waypoint vs Via point vs Shaping Point

I was asked about the difference between waypoints, via points, and shaping points. Below is my best answer. Maybe Steve Bruning will comment here.

Waypoint:

 A waypoint is a location that you mark on the map. It can be an address, an existing map feature, a point of interest, an empty spot on the map, or any other point you want. You can use waypoints to mark places like your favorite restaurant, a friend's house, etc. Waypints will be saved into BaseCamp and displayed when you select the waypoints filter (flag icon) in the search and filter window to the lower left of the BaseCamp

Via point:

Additional points that you create when you "draw" your route between the waypoints. These viapoints allow you to choose the specific roads that you take between waypoints.

Shaping Point

A shaping point is a special via point that does not annouce via audio
Newer Garmin devices with Trip Planeer like the zumo 595 and 396 are limited to 29 waypoints/viapoints per route. They do, however, permit thousands of shaping points. Routes on the NER Website designated as GPX-Shaping are created with shaping points so that they work better with these newer devices. Zumo 660s and 550s work better with the regular GPX files on the website.

Look at the attached photos for more information.

 

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Ed Conde December 5 at 6:03 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #27: Remove vs. Delete

In BaseCamp, there is a huge difference between "Remove" and "Delete."

"Remove" removes a route/waypoint, track, etc. from a folder. These items remain in BaseCamp in another folder or in the Unlisted Data folder.

"Delete" permanantly deletes the item from BaseCamp. It will be gone for good. Use "delete" with caution.A

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Ed Conde December 6 at 9:59 AM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #28: BaseCamp and the NER Best Eastern Riding Website.

Attached is a BaseCamp photo of the Best NC Roads, Views, restaurants, etc. from the NER Best Eastern Riding website. Can you visualize a nice route using these roads, views, and restaurants?

In BaseCamp, you simply select the route tool and trace over whatever you want to use. It takes about a minute. The Best Eastern Riding website covers Newfoundland to Alabama. You can create great routes this simply anywhere in the East.

No other routing program or app can begin to approach the power of the NER website plus BaseCamp.

 

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Ed Conde December 6 at 2:58 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #29: Ashfield & Selecting Routes

Windows Version (Mac version below)

From page 14 of the PC BaseCamp Agenda:

Move the cursor to the left (west) on route 116 to Ashfield, which is just before Route 112 (figure 9.) Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to move Ashfield to the center of your screen. Use the + and - keys on your numeric keyboard (or Caps Lock & + or - on the regular keyboard) to zoom/pan to Ashfield so that you can snap your route near 224 Main St as shown in Figure 10 (again, the exact address does not matter.)

 

Press the left mouse button and a via point should be inserted. The route should re-draw. Zoom out a bit so that the route looks like Figure 11. Press the Esc key to finish inserting via points. Select the hand tool to avoid making mistakes.

 

8) Before we go further, I would like to stress that a route can only be altered when it is selected. You select a route by either clicking on the magenta route with either the Select cursor or the Hand cursor or by selecting the route name in the library. Look at the differences between Figure 12 and Figure 13.


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(Mac version)

From page 14 of the Mac BaseCamp Agenda:

Move the cursor to the left (west) on route 116 to Ashfield which is just before Route 112 (figure 9.) Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to move Ashfield to the center of your screen. Use the Map controls to zoom/pan to Ashfield so that you can snap your route to the intersection of Main St and Buckland Rd (see Figure 10).

Click the left mouse button and a via point should be inserted at the intersection of Main St and Buckland Rd.
The route should re-draw so that it looks like Figure 11.


8) Before we go further, I would like to stress that a route can only be altered when it is selected. You select a route by either clicking on the magenta route with either the Select cursor or the Hand cursor or by selecting the route name in the library. Look at the differences between Figure 12 and Figure 13.

 

 

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Ed Conde December 6 at 5:42 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #30: Joining and dividing routes

This is how you do it in Windows. Perhaps someone can post for Mac.

Did you know that you can combine 2 smaller routes into one larger route? Select both routes in either the side pane or on the map. Next, right click on one of the routes and select "Join the selected routes."

Did you know that you can divide one large route into smaller routes? Double click on the route to bring up the route properties window. Select the point where you to divide the route. Right click and select "Divide."

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Ed Conde December 7 at 9:50 AM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #31: Copy vs Duplicate

This is how you do it in Windows. Perhaps someone can post for Mac.

Did you know that in BaseCamp there is a huge difference between Copy and Duplicate?

When you copy a route, waypoint, etc., you are creating a reference to the original that you can put in another folder. For example, you can have Vanilla Bean Cafe in your favorites folder and in your Vanilla Bean Ride folder. It is the exact same point. Making a change to Vanilla Bean Cafe in one folder will also change Vanilla Bean Cafe in the other folder. It is the same exact item being stored in 2 different places.

When you dupicate a route, waypoint, etc., you are creating a completely separate version of the same item. By this I mean that you can change one copy and it will not affect the other. This is very handy if you want to duplicate a ride and make changes to it without changing the original. You can change the lunch stop, end stops, and some roads, yet retain the original route for later use.

Remember, do not copy when you mean to duplicate. It can be frustrating to make a bunch of changes to a copied route and then see that your original route has now been changed forever.

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Ed Conde December 8 at 10:47 AM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #32: Moving and Erasing Points

Windows Version (Mac version below)

From page 17 of the PC BaseCamp Agenda:

9) Back to the Example. With the cursor on the map, press the H key to select the Hand Tool (if not already selected). Press and hold the left mouse button and move the map so you can see Route 2 as it appears in Figure 14 below. Zoom in so you can see Glacial Potholes to the Route 2 Hairpin (upper part of route) on full screen. Notice arrows 1 and 2 above Route 2 on the map below? We are going to insert via points at these points.

 

10) Once you are zoomed in, select the insert tool (or press I on your keyboard) - your cursor will change to a pencil with a plus sign. Hover the Insert cursor over the magenta route between Glacial Potholes and Rte 2 Hairpin until a thick black line appears connecting the Glacial Potholes waypoint to the Rte 2 Hairpin waypoint. Keep your cursor in the same spot and press the left mouse button. A thin snap line should appear. Move your cursor (and the snap line) to a spot on Route 8A near Point 1 in Figure 14. Press the left mouse button and the magenta route should snap to Point 1. Press the Esc key and switch to the hand tool to finish the change and avoid errors. Your route should look like Figure 15 below.

 

11) Change of plans. Let us move the via point that we created at point 1 over to Point 2. Select the Move Point tool icon in the toolbar (or press the M key) to select the move point tool (the cursor will change to an arrow with a small box and arrow.) Move the Move Point cursor over to the via point that you just created at Point 1 until a small black circle appears as shown in Figure 16 below.

 

Next, click the left mouse button and hold - a snap line will appear. While holding the mouse button down, move the cursor to Point 2 and then release the mouse button. The route will be re-drawn and will look like Figure 17.

 

12) You know what, I do not like that change. Let us erase the via point that we just placed at Point 2. Select the Erase Tool icon in the toolbar (or press the E key) to select the erase tool (the cursor will change to an eraser.) Move the Erase cursor over the via point that you just created at point 2 until you see a red X (Figure 18.)

 

Press the left mouse button and the point will be removed and the route will be recalculated. The route should now look like Figure 19 with a straight shot on Route 2 from the Glacial Potholes to the Rte 2 Hairpin.

 

Remember to select the hand tool afterwards so you do not make mistakes.
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(Mac version)

From page 18 of the Mac BaseCamp Agenda:

9) Back to the Example. With the cursor on the map, select the Hand Tool or press Control-H. With the Hand Tool selected click and drag the map so you can see Route 2 as it appears in Figure 14 below. Zoom in so you can see Glacial Potholes to the Route 2 Hairpin on full screen.


Notice arrows 1 and 2 above Route 2 in figure 14A? We are going to insert via points at these points. From now on, in order to save time and to defer to those who have Garmin devices with Trip Planner like the Zumo 590 and newer Nuvis (more on that later) we are not going to place via points at intersections. Just remember that points placed away from intersections will audibly announce during your ride.

 

10) Did you know that you can insert a via point while using the Hand Tool? Move the Hand Tool cursor onto the magenta line on Route 2 somewhere between Glacial Potholes and Rte 2 Hairpin. Right Click the mouse and select Insert Route Point and a Snap Line appears. Place the via point along Rte 8A by moving the cursor to a point along Rte 8A and clicking. Be sure to zoom in close enough to be sure you’re placing the via point on the road, see Figure 15.

 

11) Change of plans. Let’s move the via point that we created at point 1 over to Point 2. Move the cursor to highlight the point. A pop up balloon will open when the cursor is positioned over the point, as in Figure 16.

 

Use the Hand tool, click on route drag the point to #2 on Pond Rd near Rowe. The route will be redrawn and will look like Figure 17.

 

12) You know what, I do not like that change. Let's erase the via point that we just placed at Point 2. Double click on the route to open the route properties window, see Figure 18.

 

Highlight the point you want to delete (the point will have an orange circle around it on the map when selected) in the Route Properties Window and press the delete key or open Edit Undo or hit Command Z.

 

 

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Ed Conde December 8 at 12:02 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #33: Use it or Lose it

Learning BaseCamp is pretty easy if you slowly follow the posted Agendas and are careful not to skip anything. Ask questions.

Retaining what you learned requires that you use it. Unless you use BaseCamp, you will begin to forget what you learned. If that happens, re-do the Agendas - it goes faster each time you do it. Ask questions. We are always happy to help.

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Ed Conde December 9 at 6:01 AM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #34: Dirt Roads and BaseCamp-Google Maps

Did you know that dirt roads are represented by dashed lines and paved roads by solid lines in BaseCamp? It is not 100% reliable, but it is a good tool to use.

While Google Maps is a poor navigation choice for multi-point routing, it is great for route planning. It is easy to go back and forth between BaseCamp and GoogleMaps. One can easily use Google Maps to confirm that a road is unpaved.

An unpaved road in the Catskills is selected in BaseCamp in photo 1 below. Did you know that you can get the GPS coordinates of the center of your BaseCamp map by selecting Find>Locate coordinates as shown in photo 1? Make sure that you have your area of interest in the center of the screen before locating its coordinates.

 

You can then copy and paste the coordinates into Google Maps to see the location in Google. (photo 2.)

 

Use the gold street view icon to get a street view (photo 3.) The street view shows that the road is unpaved and in good condition.

 

You can select Google Terrain View to get a terrain overview of the location (photo 4.) You can also use satellite view to get the big picture.

 

You can reverse the process and go from Google Maps to BaseCamp. Right click on the Google Map and select What's Here? (photo 5.) Copy the GPS coordinates. Paste the coordinates into the Find>Locate coordinates window in BaseCamp.

 

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Ed Conde December 9 at 8:51 AM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #35: Exporting

Did you know that you can pick and choose what you export?

In photo 1 below, I have selected the 3 Best Massachusetts Views on Martha's Vineyard. Notice that I have selected 3 views in a list of many views. You do not need to export the entire MA Views list.

 

In photo 2, notice that I can export the 3 MV views as a gpx file, a Google Earth KML file, or 4 other formats.

 

You have total flexibility on what you export. You can email, message, or tests these files to a friend.

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Ed Conde December 9 at 4:00 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #36: Waypoint and Route References Tab.

Did you know that all waypoints and routes have a reference tab where you can keep track of all lists and routes that an item may be located in?
Double click on the waypoint or route to open the waypoint/route properties window. Select the references tab to see all the locations that reference your waypoint/ route.

As you can see in the attached photo, a waypoint/route can appear in many places in BaseCamp. This database structure is what gives BaseCamp its power. The database structure can also be a problem if you are not organized. If you create or download a route with Vanilla Bean Cafe, it is very easy to end up with 2 versions of Vanilla Bean Cafe (and then 3 and then 4.....) Make sure that you copy and paste items to different folders when needed instead of creating unwanted duplications.

 

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Ed Conde December 10 at 7:31 AM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #37: Activity Profiles.

Most who are following this series know that I am a big proponent of turning off all avoidances and setting the Route Preference to Faster Time when creating routes. My justification is that it is best to not rely on the GPS for routing decisions, especially if you may be sharing your routes. All NER Rides are created with avoidances off and the route preference set to Faster Time.

What is you wish to create some routes with curvy roads set or some avoidances turned on? Changing the Motorcycling Activity Profile will change all routes created with that profile. Hence, all NER Rides in your BaseCamp will change if you modify your avoidances and/or route preferences.

What to do? The answer is using Activity Profiles. Activity Profiles are a specific set of avoidances and route preferences that one uses when creating rides. You can have one Motorcycle Profile with all avoidances turned off and faster time selected. You could have another profile called Motorcycling-Curvy that uses the Curvy setting and avoids unpaved roads.

To create a new Activity Profile (in Windows), go to Edit>Options (photo 1 below.) Select Activity Profile (photo 2). The green plus sign next to the current profile allows you to create new profiles. The routing tab allows you to change avoidances and route preferences.

 

The drop down menu (photo 3) shows all of the current activity profiles. I have created Motorcycling - Curvy and Motorcycling - Shortest as alternative profiles. You can customize road speeds (photo 4) for all road types so that your GPS arrival times match your preferred riding speeds.

 

Select the appropriate activity profile for your rides so that all your rides play well together. A quick look at the route icon lets you know which profile your route was created with. Remember, a change to an activity profile changes ALL routes created with that profile.

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Ed Conde December 10 at 2:01 PM

GPS/BaseCamp Post #38: Creating waypoints and ensuring that they are actually in your route.

Windows Version (Mac version below)

From page 21 of the PC BaseCamp Agenda:

13) Do you see that great twisty section of route 2 marked "Curvy" on Figure 19 above? Let us place a warning waypoint just before that section of the route to let us know that it is coming. Use the hand tool (press H) to move the curvy section to the middle of the screen.

Zoom in to the curvy section. To do this, select the zoom tool icon in the toolbar (or press the Z key.) Move the zoom cursor to the curvy section and press the left mouse button to zoom or the right mouse button to pan.
Next, select the Waypoint Tool icon in the toolbar (or press the W key) to select the waypoint tool (the cursor will change to an arrow with a small square.) Move the Waypoint cursor to a spot on Route 2 just to the right of the curvy section. Press the left mouse button and the waypoint will be added to the map that should look like Figure 20 below. (If you make a mistake placing a waypoint, you can select Edit>Undo from the menu.)

 

Let us change the waypoint name and icon so that it better describes the road ahead. Move your cursor to the waypoint on the map and click on its name (mine is Mohawk Tr2). Press the left mouse button to open the Waypoint Properties Window as shown in Figure 21.

 

Change the waypoint name to curvy and the icon to a red flag. You can resize all properties windows by moving your cursor to the corner or edge of the window until a double-sided arrow appears. Press and hold the left mouse button and move the cursor to resize the window. When finished, close the Waypoint Properties Window.

The waypoint shows on the map and in the Temp folder, but it is not yet part of the route. To add it to the route, the route must be selected. To do this, select the Select Tool icon in the toolbar (or press the S key) to select the Select Tool (the cursor will change to an arrow.) Move the Select cursor over the route near the curvy waypoint and press the left mouse button - the route will become bold and will be highlighted in your library.

Now we can add the waypoint to the route. Select the Insert Tool (or press I on your keyboard) - your cursor will change to a pencil with a plus sign. Hover the Insert cursor over the magenta route near the curvy waypoint until a thick black line appears. Keep your cursor in the same spot and press the left mouse button. A thin snap line should appear as shown in Figure 22 below.

 

Move your cursor (and the snap line) to curvy waypoint until a curvy waypoint flag appears. Press the left mouse button and the curvy waypoint will be inserted into the route. Press the Esc to get rid of the snap line. Select the hand tool.
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(Mac version)

From page 22 of the Mac BaseCamp Agenda:

 

13) Do you see that great twisty section of route 2 marked "Curvy" on Figure 19 above? Let’s place a warning waypoint just before that section of the route to let us know that it is coming. Use the Hand Tool (Control - H) to move the curvy section to the middle of the screen.

Zoom in to the curvy section. To do this, select the Zoom Tool icon in the toolbar (or Control-Z). Move the zoom cursor to the curvy section and press the left mouse button to zoom or the right mouse button to pan.
Next, select the Waypoint Tool in the toolbar (or Control-W) to select the Waypoint Tool (the cursor will change to an arrow with a flag.) Move the Waypoint cursor to a spot on Route 2 just to the right of the curvy section. Press the left mouse button and the waypoint will be added to the map which should look like Figure 20 below. (If you make a mistake placing a waypoint, you can select Edit>Undo from the menu.)

 

Let’s change the waypoint name and icon so that it better describes the road ahead. Highlight the waypoint in the lower left pane, then right click and select Get Info to open the Waypoint Properties Window as shown in Figure 21. Change the waypoint name to Curvy and the icon to a red flag.

 

The waypoint shows on the map and in the Temp folder, but it is not yet part of the route. To add it to the route, the route must be selected. To do this, select the Select Tool icon in the toolbar (or Control – S) to select the Select Tool (the cursor will change to an arrow.) Move the Select cursor over the route near the curvy waypoint and press the left mouse button - the route will become bold and will be highlighted in your library.

Now we can add the waypoint to the route. Double click the route to open the Route Dialog Box. Highlight the waypoint in the lower right pane and drag it into the route dialog box between the Glacial Potholes and Rte 2 Hairpin waypoints. (See figure 22 below)

 

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